1. Land of Five Rivers?

Answer: Punjab

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MCQ-> Read the following passage and answer the questions. PassageThe founder of the Bhoodan Yapia or the Land Gifts Mission was Acharya Vinoba Bhave. a close associate and follower of Mahatma Gandhi. This movement, which was one of the greatest land reform movements in Independent India. was started in the year 1951 in Pochampalli. Telangana. hi the spring of 1951 there was a meeting of rural workers in Hyderabad. Since Vinoba Bhave never used money, he decided to walk to this meeting which was some 300 miles away from where he lived. On the way, in every village through which he passed, he came face to face with the misery of the poor. landless farmers. He realized that he should leave no stone unturned in his mission to seek justice and land for his poor countrymen. When he reached Hyderabad he went straight to a village and in one of the prayer meetings he appealed to the landlords. He said. If you had five sons and a sixth were born to you. wouldn't you give him a portion of your estate? Treat me as your sixth son and give me one-sixth of your land for redistribution to the poor." His words struck a chord among the landlords. Land was voluntarily donated and within the two months that he spent in Hyderabad. Vinoba received nearly 12.000 acres in trust for the landless. Encouraged by this success, he travelled across India to convince the wealthy landlords to share a small area of their land with their poor, landless neighbours. By 1969, the Bhoodan movement had collected over 4 million acres of land for redistribution.When and where was the Bhoodan movement started?
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MCQ->ln the following question, two statements are given followed by four conclusions. Taking the given statements to be true, decide which of the given conclusions logically follows from the given statements:Statements: Some rivers are plateau. No plateau is mountain. Conclusions: I. Some plateau are rivers. II.Some mountains are rivers. III.Some rivers are not mountains. IV. All mountains are rivers....
MCQ-> Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions. Long ago, a Brahmin called Haridatta lived in a little village. He was a farmer but the piece of land he cultivated provided him with so little to survive on that he was very poor. One day, unable to stand the heat of the summer sun, he went to rest for a whilevunder a big tree on his land. Before he could stretch out on the ground, he saw a huge black cobra slithering out of an anthill nearby. The snake then spread hisvhood and swayed gracefully from side to side. Haridatta was astonished tov seevthis and he thought, “This cobra must really be the god of this land. I have nevervseen or worshipped him before, which is probably why I am not able to get anything from the land. From this day onwards, I will worship him.” He hurried back to his home at once and returned with a glass full of milk. He poured it into a bowl and turning to the anthill said, “0 ruler of the land, I did not know you were living in this anthill. That is why I have not paid my tribute to you. Please accept my apologies for this omission and accept this humble offering.” He then placed the bowl of milk at the entrance of the anthill and left the place. The next day when the Brahmin arrived to work on his land before the sun rose, he found a gold coin in the bowl he had left at the anthill. He was very happy indeed and from that day on, he made it a practice to offer the cobra milk in a bowl each day. The next morning he would collect a gold coin and leave. One day Haridatta had to go to a neighbouring village on business. He asked his son to go to the anthill as usual and leave a bowl of milk for the cobra. The son did as he was told, but when he went to the same spot the next day and collected the gold coin he thought, “This anthill must be full of gold. If I kill the cobra, I can collect all the gold in an instant, instead of having to waste my time coming here every day.” He then struck the cobra with a big stick. The cobra deftly dodged the blow but bit Haridatta’s son with his poisonous fangs. The boy soon died. When Haridatta returned to his village the next day, he heard how his son had met his death. He realised at once that his son’s greed would probably have caused him to attack the cobra. The Brahmin went to the anthill the day after his son’s cremation and offered milk to the cobra as usual. This time, the cobra did not even come out of his hole. Instead, he called out to Haridatta, “You have come here for gold, forgetting That you have just lost a precious son and that you are in mourning. The reason for this is pure greed. From today, there is no meaning to our relationship. I am going to give you a diamond as a final gift. But please don’t ever come back again.” He slithered away as the Brahmin watched.Which of the following is TRUE according to the story ?
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MCQ-> The story begins as the European pioneers crossed the Alleghenies and started to settle in the Midwest. The land they found was covered with forests. With incredible efforts they felled the trees, pulled the stumps and planted their crops in the rich, loamy soil. When they finally reached the western edge of the place we now call Indiana, the forest stopped and ahead lay a thousand miles of the great grass prairie. The Europeans were puzzled by this new environment. Some even called it the “Great Desert”. It seemed untillable. The earth was often very wet and it was covered with centuries of tangled and matted grasses. With their cast iron plows, the settlers found that the prairie sod could not be cut and the wet earth stuck to their plowshares. Even a team of the best oxen bogged down after a few years of tugging. The iron plow was a useless tool to farm the prairie soil. The pioneers were stymied for nearly two decades. Their western march was hefted and they filled in the eastern regions of the Midwest.In 1837, a blacksmith in the town of Grand Detour, Illinois, invented a new tool. His name was John Deere and the tool was a plow made of steel. It was sharp enough to cut through matted grasses and smooth enough to cast off the mud. It was a simple too, the “sod buster” that opened the great prairies to agricultural development.Sauk Country, Wisconsin is the part of that prairie where I have a home. It is named after the Sauk Indians. In i673 Father Marquette was the first European to lay his eyes upon their land. He found a village laid out in regular patterns on a plain beside the Wisconsin River. He called the place Prairie du Sac) The village was surrounded by fields that had provided maize, beans and squash for the Sauk people for generations reaching back into the unrecorded time.When the European settlers arrived at the Sauk prairie in 1837, the government forced the native Sank people west of the Mississippi River. The settlers came with John Deere’s new invention and used the tool to open the area to a new kind of agriculture. They ignored the traditional ways of the Sank Indians and used their sod-busting tool for planting wheat. Initially, the soil was generous and the nurturing thrived. However each year the soil lost more of its nurturing power. It was only thirty years after the Europeans arrived with their new technology that the land was depleted, Wheat farming became uneconomic and tens of thousands of farmers left Wisconsin seeking new land with sod to bust.It took the Europeans and their new technology just one generation to make their homeland into a desert. The Sank Indians who knew how to sustain themselves on the Sauk prairie land were banished to another kind of desert called a reservation. And they even forgot about the techniques and tools that had sustained them on the prairie for generations unrecorded. And that is how it was that three deserts were created — Wisconsin, the reservation and the memories of a people. A century later, the land of the Sauks is now populated by the children of a second wave of European tanners who learned to replenish the soil through the regenerative powers of dairying, ground cover crops and animal manures. These third and fourth generation farmers and townspeople do not realise, however, that a new settler is coming soon with an invention as powerful as John Deere’s plow.The new technology is called ‘bereavement counselling’. It is a tool forged at the great state university, an innovative technique to meet the needs of those experiencing the death of a loved one, tool that an “process” the grief of the people who now live on the Prairie of the Sauk. As one can imagine the final days of the village of the Sauk Indians before the arrival of the settlers with John Deere’s plow, one can also imagine these final days before the arrival of the first bereavement counsellor at Prairie du Sac) In these final days, the farmers arid the townspeople mourn at the death of a mother, brother, son or friend. The bereaved is joined by neighbours and kin. They meet grief together in lamentation, prayer and song. They call upon the words of the clergy and surround themselves in community.It is in these ways that they grieve and then go on with life. Through their mourning they are assured of the bonds between them and renewed in the knowledge that this death is a part of the Prairie of the Sauk. Their grief is common property, an anguish from which the community draws strength and gives the bereaved the courage to move ahead.It is into this prairie community that the bereavement counsellor arrives with the new grief technology. The counsellor calls the invention a service and assures the prairie folk of its effectiveness and superiority by invoking the name of the great university while displaying a diploma and certificate. At first, we can imagine that the local people will be puzzled by the bereavement counsellor’s claim, However, the counsellor will tell a few of them that the new technique is merely o assist the bereaved’s community at the time of death. To some other prairie folk who are isolated or forgotten, the counsellor will approach the Country Board and advocate the right to treatment for these unfortunate souls. This right will be guaranteed by the Board’s decision to reimburse those too poor tc pay for counselling services. There will be others, schooled to believe in the innovative new tools certified by universities and medical centres, who will seek out the bereavement counsellor by force of habit. And one of these people will tell a bereaved neighbour who is unschooled that unless his grief is processed by a counsellor, he will probably have major psychological problems in later life. Several people will begin to use the bereavement counsellor because, since the Country Board now taxes them to insure access to the technology, they will feel that to fail to be counselled is to waste their money, and to be denied a benefit, or even a right.Finally, one day, the aged father of a Sauk woman will die. And the next door neighbour will not drop by because he doesn’t want to interrupt the bereavement counsellor. The woman’s kin will stay home because they will have learned that only the bereavement counsellor knows how to process grief the proper way. The local clergy will seek technical assistance from the bereavement counsellor to learn the connect form of service to deal with guilt and grief. And the grieving daughter will know that it is the bereavement counsellor who really cares for her because only the bereavement counsellor comes when death visits this family on the Prairie of the Sauk.It will be only one generation between the bereavement counsellor arrives and the community of mourners disappears. The counsellor’s new tool will cut through the social fabric, throwing aside kinship, care, neighbourly obligations and communality ways cc coming together and going on. Like John Deere’s plow, the tools of bereavement counselling will create a desert we a community once flourished, And finally, even the bereavement counsellor will see the impossibility of restoring hope in clients once they are genuinely alone with nothing but a service for consolation. In the inevitable failure of the service, the bereavement counsellor will find the deserts even in herself.Which one of the following best describes the approach of the author?
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MCQ-> Read the following passage to answer the given question Some words have been printed in bold to help you to locate them while answering some of the questions. We tend to be harsh on our bureaucracy,but nowhere do citizens enjoy dealing with their government. They do it because they have to. But that doesn’t mean that the experience has to be dismal. Now there is a new wind blowing through government departments around the world, which could takes some of the pain away. In the next five years it may well transform not only the way public services are delivered but also the fundamental relationship between government and citizens. Not surprisingly, it is the Internet that is behind it. After e-commerce and e-business the next revolution may be e-governance. Examples abound. The municipality of Phoenix, Arizona, allows its citizens to renew their car registrations, pay traffic fines, replace lost identity cards etc. online without having to stand in endless queues in a grubby municipal office. The municipality is happy because it saves $5 a transaction it costs only $1.60 to do it across the counter. In Chile people routinely submit their income tax returns over the Internet Which has increased transparency, drastically reduced the time taken and the number of errors and litigation with the tax department. Both taxpayers and the revenue department are happier. The furthest ahead not surprisingly is the small, rich and entrepreneurial civil service of singapore which allows citizens to do more functions online than any other As in many private companies the purchasing and buying of Singapore’s government departments is now on the Web and cost benefits come through more competitive bidding easy access to global suppliers and time saved by online processing of orders. They can post their catalogues on their sites, bid for contracts submit in voices and check their payments status over the Net. The most useful idea for Indians municipalities is Gov Works a private sector site that collects local taxes fines and utility bills for 3,600 municipalities across the United States. It is citizen's site which provides information on government jobs, tenders, etc .The most ambitious is the British government, which has targeted to convert 100 per cent of its transactions with its citizens to the Internet by 2005. Cynics in India will say, 'Oh, e-government will never work in India. We are so poor and we dont have computers but they are wrong. There are many experiments afoot in India as well Citizens in Andhra Pradesh can download government forms and applications on the net without having bribe clerks.In many district land records are online and this had created transparency Similary, in Dhar district to Madhya Pradesh villagers have begun to file applications for land transfers and follow their progress on the net. In seventy village in the Kolhapur and Sangli districts in Maharashtra Internet booths have come up where farmers daily check the markets rates of agricultural commodities in Marathi along with data on agriculture schemes information on crop technology. When to spray and plant the crops and buds and railway timetables. They also find vocational guidance on jobs, applications for ration cards kerosene/gas burners and land records extracts with details of landownership. Sam pitroda’s World Tel, Reliance Industries and the Tamil Nadu government are jointly laying 3,000 km of optic fibre cables to create a, Tamil Network which will offers ration cards schools college and hospital admission forms land records and pension records. If successful World Tel will expand the network to Gujarat, Karnataka and West Bengal. In kerala all the villages are getting linked online to the district headquarters allowing citizens to compare the development properties of their village with other villagers in the state. Many are still skeptical of the real impact because so few Indians have computers. The answer lies in interactive cable T.V and in Internet kiosks, Although India has only five million computers and thirty-eight million telephones it has thirty four million homes with cable TV and these are growing eight percent a year By 2005 most cable homes will have access to the Internet from many of the 700,000 local STD/PCO booths. Internet usage may be low today, but it is bound to grow rapidly in the future, and e-government in India may not be a dream.According to the passage which country has the most ambitious plan for e-governance ?
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